Direct to Garment Printing

Front side of a white burnout T

DTG on the back of a white burnout T

DTG on the back of a white burnout T

DTG on a steel blue burnout T

DTG on a steel blue burnout T

DTG on the back of a steel burnout T

DTG on the back of a steel burnout T

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week a client who has hired us to produce a paddle sport apparel line and also teaches yoga, was looking for a trendy t-shirt. I asked some of my printers if they have ever tried DTG or Direct To Garment Printing on a burnout and no one had.

So I grabbed a white and a steel blue t-shirt to compare the printing of their gorgeous, colorful logo. Typically, printers print silk screen on burn out t’s, but that tends to get very heavy by using the ink and also expensive due to all the colors and screens for this particular logo.

The client was amazed and excited when they saw the samples and their mind started spinning thinking of different garments and ways we could use this new print technique. I showed them several blanks (other trendy burnout garments, such a pink paisley pattern hoodie and a slub vneck T-shirt.

What is Direct to Garment printing?

Direct to garment printing, also known as DTG printing, digital direct to garment printing, digital apparel printing, and inkjet to garment printing, is a process of printing on textiles and garments using specialized or modified inkjet technology. The two key requirements of a DTG printer are a transport mechanism for the garment and specialty inks (inkjet textile inks) that are applied to the textile directly and are absorbed by the fibers.

Direct to garment (DTG) printing is most commonly implemented on garments that are made of cotton or cotton blends, although recent developments in technology have allowed for superior performance on light colored polyester and cotton/poly blends. And even most recently they can print on black t-shirts adding a cure process and white ink underlay.

What is a Burnout T?
Burnout fabric can be found in many of today’s t-shirts and scarves. The thin fabric is comfortable against the skin and decals are often layered on top of both men’s and women’s designs. Burnout is otherwise known as devore or “broderie chimique.” It was used in France to create the look of embroidery, without sewing. The devore design is created by chemically destroying a fabric with sodium bisulphate. Most fabrics that are used to create the burnout look are specially chosen to hold up to some fabric destruction.

DTG on the back of a white burnout T

 

 

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